Hi, I’m Yarrow.

I create handmade WordPress websites and support people in building sustainable businesses that are aligned with their values and fun to work in.

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Fun fact: I’m hosting a free virtual business retreat on July 24th & 25th that you’ll get an invite to in addition to my monthly-ish newsletter full of small business magic. 

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#62 5 tips to help you stay motivated & create supportive structures in your business

#62 5 tips to help you stay motivated & create supportive structures in your business

Hi everyone!

Summer is upon us – often a time out of time spent in another pace & dream state. I reallyyy hope you get to just rest, read and reflect lots *and* I love talking about tools for authentic motivation (as opposed to fear driven frantic doing).

This episode is full of ideas for creating supportive structure in your business, which I hope will help you feel motivated and in touch with the bigger picture and the reason you started your business in the first place. We’ve all been through a lot this past year and in many cases our businesses and ideas for the future have changed dramatically. I believe that in amongst all this turmoil it’s more important than ever to have a beautiful container for your work, one that sets you up for success in your own unique way. 

Enjoy!

Here is more info on Create & Launch with early bird pricing till June 18th: https://yarrowdigital.com/create-launch/

and here is the invite to the free summer retreat: https://yarrowdigital.com/summer-retreat/

Listen to the DIY Small Business Podcast

on Apple Podcast // Stitcher // Spotify // Soundcloud

 

⋒ Hi, my name is Yarrow and I am your host.

My Embodied Business podcast explores what it means to build a small business with integrity, joy and anti capitalist values. I interview other small business owners and offer solo episodes in which I am answering questions around tech, strategy, more ethical marketing and creative livelihoods.

You can learn more about my web design, tech support, mentoring and community offerings at YarrowDigital.com

Sign up for my newsletter below if you'd like to hear from me about once a month! ⋒

Transcript

00:00

Hey, everyone, my name is Yarrow and you’re listening to the embody business podcast, really happy to have you. And I’m gonna try at least to make this really short and sweet recording. So I’m just coming out of teaching and evergreen class in the embody business community, or rather a class about making evergreen classes and courses. And one question that came up, I think was really important, which is, what kind of topics actually working as evergreen self study options. So we talked about the fact that many people struggle to complete a self study course in their own time, be that about because of overwhelm, or it might not being there possibly not being the right format, all kinds of reasons, right. And I think that’s really common, I know that I’ve taken classes that I haven’t completed, and that I might have completed if it had been, like a firm container, a life class with group accountability. So I’m really want to say that I’m only speaking for my own experience here. And I think there’s no way of knowing exactly what’s going to work for someone, I think something really valuable that you can do if you’re interested in this question. As you just ask your community, we that on Instagram, or on your newsletter, or in people that you just know, about how they would enjoy learning something from you and what they would like to learn and different kinds of formats. So, on my last podcast episode, I talked a little bit about the process of creating an evergreen and why I think that can be a really good thing for your business. So to recap, really quickly, I think the key takeaways were that it’s a great way to share something across time and space. In some cases, it can be a more accessible way for people to learn something. And it can be a smaller commitment. So if you have people that can afford with working with you one on one, for example, this might be a really nice way to make some of your work more accessible to more people. Of course, there’s more to accessibility than just pricing, which is a bigger conversation. But generally, this is one aspect of it. And of course, also it can make you some extra income, and maybe create a little bit more financial stability in your business, and therefore allow you to rest more and take more creative risks. I also think that Korea’s production can be easier than we sometimes make it, I know that I have really made it unnecessarily hard for myself in the past, for example, by forcing myself to create screen facing videos where I try to look nice and brush my hair and get good lighting. And then look at the camera and read something off the screen, I actually found that really difficult. And I now mostly record my classes by sharing slides, which is actually helpful for people to look at, or by sharing my screens. When I’m teaching something more technical, like WordPress, or branding them, I’m just showing people directly what I’m doing, which is actually much better than looking at my face in that case. Okay, so this is a quick recap, and also to say again, that in July, starting July 5, I am offering a live four week programme called create and launch, where we’ll have four modules that are pre recorded, and that really show you step by step how to you can create your first class or course. And then we’ll have Monday, live classes. q&a is where you can ask questions, meet other people share your process, and really make sure that you get this done. So by the end of December, you have a nice evergreen product that you can offer people as we head into the back to school vibe. I will link to that in the show notes. It’s $180, early bird pricing towards June 18. Okay, so now about what kind of topics can work for evergreen courses. And again, we just speaking from my own experience, I think something that I’m really curious about is the diversity and learning that we see. And also the fact that the internet is really still so young. So while there are some interesting studies out there around what does and doesn’t work for people who are learning online, there’s also just so much that we haven’t tried or that is really new to us in some ways. So I want to kind of just bring that to our attention and allow us to have like a playful, curious, open approach to this because, yeah, it’s pretty new. And I love pedagogy and the idea of really thinking about how we can share knowledge and power in beautiful ways.

 

04:43

I think the core question is, what can I teach that is independently achievable to people, right? And that’s actually like a really good and really simple question to ask. It doesn’t have to be super complicated. Just look at what you know and what you do in your work. Ask yourself why you’re excited about it. Maybe also ask yourself what you would like to share with your younger self. So I know, there’s so many things I wish I had known sooner in my business. And I’m really excited to share them with other people now, for example, how to create an evergreen class, or how to make a website or how to make a brand, or how to question shows social media. So I think that is a really beautiful starting point, what do you wish you had known sooner? Or what would you like to share with your younger self? And, yeah, so the next thing I think that’s helpful to think about is, where is this offering falling on the spectrum of kind of the magic of group accountability to get stuff done, versus it being kind of on their own time, and then complete privacy? This privacy piece is something I found interesting. And I saw it first mentioned by someone called Katherine Mae, who wrote the book wintering, and it’s offering writing classes. So she has an evergreen course. And then description, she says, you can take this course, with full privacy. And I was like, Oh, yeah, you know, like, that actually, is interesting. Makes sense. Because there are certain things I think, that I would like to learn about, and I’m curious about, but I don’t necessarily want to share them immediately. So I used to write poetry in my 20s, for example, and I kind of just stopped 10 years ago. Now, I feel kind of awkward, but also excited. And so I would like to take a poetry class this summer, but I’m not actually ready to share any of my poetry writing, or I don’t necessarily want to be in like a live class with other people who write or read out. And then, you know, share notes and stuff, I think I’m just feeling a bit too shy to do that at this point. And that’s just one of many examples, right? But there’s different, there’s definitely also other things where I know, I need to be in some kind of container to actually make the thing happen. So really think about your own experience. Because likely in your business, or in your community around your business, you have attracted people that are having things in common with you, you know, so, you know, what do you enjoy? And in what you study? Do you? Have you made really good experiences with evergreen courses? And why did those work for you? And if your experiences weren’t that good? Why was bad? Did it feel disappointing? to kind of be on your own with the material? Or did you have questions that maybe you needed support around? Or did you just need more structure and accountability? So having a think about the kinds of obstacles that can come up with people. And I think the main kind of categories that I would group them in as are the following. So the first one is uncertainty about how to work with the material. So I’ve definitely experienced that where I sign up for something where I was mostly on my own with the material, or there was some kind of guidance, but I was just kind of overwhelmed as to what, where to start. And I think I wouldn’t have needed kind of like a nice welcome section, or a welcome email that literally lays out for me step by step, what I should do first and what follows. And why this makes sense, right. So this is something that’s avoidable, I think. But it’s easier said than done in a way. And the second thing I think can come up is resistance to change and transformation or creative work. This could be brought actually, but transformational creative work is kind of my experience of that. Not working where I have signed up for self study courses that were pushing an edge for me, that I couldn’t kind of get beat past by myself, basically. So I, I have this story, which I know many people have, and which is very silly in a way. They can’t draw, but I feel really strongly about it. I know it’s not true. I know. We’re all artists, I really believe that I say that to other people from my heart. But it also, you know, have this part of myself that’s like, I can’t draw and love story. And so I signed up for a really small self study course.

 

09:23

I think it was like a five part class, where it’s meant to learn how to draw birds. And I received a welcome I was just like one email. So it wasn’t really like taken through the experience, for example, by getting a an email a week that would have nudged me. So I just got one email that kind of dumped all the content on me. And I watched the first video I tried to draw a bird. Like kind of got frustrated. And I mean, this was such an easy thing, right? It wasn’t asking a tonne of me. I was just about to watch for more videos and do more writing at Drawing exercises. But I think I feel so silly saying this out loud now, because obviously I signed up for the class, I made this decision to learn how to draw birds, but it didn’t follow through. I got overwhelmed and distracted with those stuff. And I think I was just feeling resistant, in this part of myself that really wants to be an artist, but just feels very frustrated about the fact that my drawings initially don’t really look like actual boards. And so, and so I kind of just dropped the class, right. And also I didn’t get I didn’t get follow up emails, that would have been nice. There wasn’t like a way to ask questions or have a q&a session or something. So yeah, so that’s just like one that was my dog. Sorry. That’s like just an example of how sometimes I think when we’re inviting people into bigger transformations, oh, my God, sorry. We’re inviting people into bigger transformations. Sometimes we just need to also offer support. And there’s a tonne of really transformational stuff, I think that can be taught in evergreen sales to the courses. But it really depends on the person, right. And I think also to a very big range of people learning how to draw birds on the on their own, would have been amazing, you know, they just don’t have the same kind of stuff around, not being able to draw that I have. Okay, so another thing that can come up, I think, is a lack of time and attention span. And that just, that just depends on the person. I think as as facilitators, there’s not a time that we can do about that. And also, I think we need to leave people with the self responsibility of making the time if they want to learn something. And that totally applies to myself, of course, you know, like, there’s something kind of silly and signing up for something and they’re not doing the thing. And if if you do that repeatedly, then maybe that’s inviting you to ask yourself some questions about what you want to prioritise in your life and whether you maybe are overwhelming yourself with too much content. Yeah, so. And then the last piece, I’ll say that it can kind of can can come up as an obstacle, I think, is just having unanswered questions. And I think that can be a problem when we’re teaching something for the first time. And we haven’t really got a feeling yet for the kinds of questions that people might have. I think that I hope in my classes that all the main questions are covered. And what I’m going to do moving forward for my evergreen self study stuff is to offer a really simple form. I’m going to use Google form which is free, and it’s just had, I have three questions. The first is your name and email. What is your question? And then the third question is, do you have any other feedback? And so I’m going to collect these questions, and I’m going to answer them on a podcast or on a blog, depending on which format works best for the question at hand. And I think that’s a great way I think is a win win win, actually, because it allows me to offer evergreen courses that still have this element of support if people really do have questions. The second benefit is I think that people will have a think about whether their question has or has not been answered yet. That is my hope, at least, you know, I think that people will really read through the material or listen or watch it before they go ahead and use this form. And the third benefit is I think that my answers will be available for free for anyone, right, they will be on a blog post, or in the podcast. And it might be a question that other people that don’t take my current class have as well. So that’s useful for everyone. And it’s also not tying me to a specific schedule of teaching live all the time. So I feel like that is a really good balance between an evergreen and a glide coupe experience. With the creator launch classes coming up in July, I feel that

 

14:05

it will be really beautiful for me to facilitate this live and to see what people are working on. And I also think that because there can be a lot of resistance around creating your first class or course, and some technical stuff that come out, it will be really nice to be able to offer this accountability. But I also totally think that afterwards, this course might be available as an evergreen for people who are actually really happy to do it on your own and don’t necessarily need the group support. So I want to talk a little bit more about what hasn’t hasn’t worked for me and my own experience of taking evergreen classes. So what hasn’t worked for me is longer containers that asked me to change my behaviour or develop a new habit. So I have done Julia Cameron’s book the artists way a couple of times for example, and I really enjoy some aspects of it. I changed the language in some cases for myself, because I find that more relatable. And I really love the idea of of writing every morning. And when I do, I really see that it makes a big difference in my life. And in a way, you know, is a book. But it’s also kind of a self study course, it’s meant to be like a 12 week programme that you take yourself through. And I know that people who do really take themselves through it have amazing results. In another way, I also know that writing three, four pages every morning by hand, right consistently going on Adas day, every week is a big lifestyle change in a way. And I do these things very frequently right now in my life and have for a long time. So I definitely have like, weekly evenings where I go on an artist day, if you want to call it that with myself, and I’m undistracted and I just drop into something really pleasurable or creative that I like to do. And I also journal all the time. So over time, I have kind of achieved what I set out to do, I guess, by buying this book. But it took me several attempts. And I think it might have been nice to join a group to change to exchange notes on this. Because I think, yeah, like I said, you know, compared to my mid 20s, where I had a much more hectic and slightly chaotic lifestyle, this is a massive change in my habits to be journaling almost every day and to have these rituals for myself. So I needed lots of different things over long periods of time to come together to now be in a place where I have, you know, I’ve made that room in my life for these things.

 

16:32

Yeah.

 

16:35

So yeah, so these kind of things that are longer containers. 12 weeks feels like a long time to be in a self study experience. And I say this now. And then I also think about the fact that I’ve done my first degree from home, studying over distance, which was a three year experience, which is obviously much bigger. So it really depends, I guess. But yeah, for me, personally transformative staff, meeting creative edges, we’re doing work around shame or sexuality has historically been things that I wanted to do in groups so that I could have that support. And that also the fact of being witnessed, it’s been important for me, things that have really worked well for me, as evergreens have been smaller containers. So things that I’ve done maybe between two and four weeks, where I wanted to learn something smaller and tangible. So example I’ve taken herbal herbalism classes where I learned about making an herbal infused oils, or making certain kinds of potions or learning about sleeping better and creating like sleep hygiene rituals. I also took smaller creative writing classes or journaling stuff, I took a lot of ritual classes that I really loved. And they all had like kind of a really specific aim and just as a smaller time span. So that worked really well for me. And then the area of business I also taking classes around newsletter building, finding confidence, creating courses, it’s a quiz. This is a bit more time now. But that’s also you know, classes, but I enjoyed studying by myself. And as a general guideline, what I’m taking away for the from this from this question, like what topics work for evergreen classes, in my own work is that I want to teach things as an evergreen if that have a measurable practical outcome, or if they can be contained and two or three modules. So either of those two things needs to apply for me. So measurable practical outcome for me, that would be something like helping someone to learn how to create credit and branding and Canva. Or I have this short questioning social media class, learning how to create a WordPress website that is complex, it might work better for people in a live container. But if someone is really determined, and they are on a budget, I trust that they can learn through this course to do by themselves. And the alternative would be two or three modules. And I think that’s what I imagine I will kind of have as a guideline over at what was previously dangerous was and is now called, which shows the nature. And so what I would like to teach there, for example, it’s a class on heartbreak. But awkward to say that and I have been procrastinating that for this very reason for ages. I feel like I’ve been heartbroken a lot in my 20s. And actually, I would really love to record a class like an audio class with a workbook with sweet rituals that you can do when you’re heartbroken and it’s not going to be a massive deal or something that’s going to take months. I imagine this is some like a smaller class that someone takes when when they’re currently heartbroken. I’d also love to teach more. Oh, I’m sorry. That was I would love to teach more around rituals where certain time of the year rituals or certain phases or situations or transitions in life. So those would all be kind of smaller pieces. And then where I actually really see the benefit of being in groups and being live is the creative space sessions that I’m teaching through my Patreon. So for about eight months, I think from from autumn last year to very recently, I was offering live creative space sessions every other week. And we would just meet on zoom, we would open with a meditation, I would draw a card, sometimes there would be journaling prompts, and then we would quietly kind of create together. And that countability I think worked really well for that group. People show out really frequently, and everyone was like, just committing to their own practice. And we didn’t always interact a great deal talked a lot about the work that we were making. But people were painting and writing and drawing or leaving or knitting. And it was just really nice to be together. So I think all this to say that I definitely see the value in both and that I think different things just work really well in different situations. So hope this has given you some ideas of what you might teach as an evergreen class in your course. If you have any questions let me know again, if you want to go deeper join the create and launch programme. I would love to have you thank you so much for listening

#61 What kinds of topics work for evergreen classes? 

#61 What kinds of topics work for evergreen classes? 

Hey everyone,

I’m just coming out of a class on creating evergreen classes in the Embodied Business Community and wanted to expand on a really great question that came up – what kinds of topics can actually work as evergreen classes?

I know for myself that sometimes I really need the accountability and the witnessing of a live group, but in some cases being able to take a class in my own time, with privacy and some guidance is a better and more economical option. I don’t have a black and white answer for you on what works, I think it really depends on the subject and the person who wants to explore something new, but I am sharing some useful ideas, questions and experiences in this episode to hopefully help you get a clearer picture on what kinds of things you might want to teach and how.

Enjoy!

Here is the Create & Launch program that starts on July 5th with early bird pricing till June 18th: https://yarrowdigital.com/create-launch/

Listen to the DIY Small Business Podcast

on Apple Podcast // Stitcher // Spotify // Soundcloud

 

⋒ Hi, my name is Yarrow and I am your host.

My Embodied Business podcast explores what it means to build a small business with integrity, joy and anti capitalist values. I interview other small business owners and offer solo episodes in which I am answering questions around tech, strategy, more ethical marketing and creative livelihoods.

You can learn more about my web design, tech support, mentoring and community offerings at YarrowDigital.com

Sign up for my newsletter below if you'd like to hear from me about once a month! ⋒

Transcript

Hey, everyone, my name is Yarrow and you’re listening to the embodied business podcast. Thank you for joining me, I hope this is going to be short and sweet and also really motivating episode for you. So I want to talk about five things that I find really helpful in creating structure for my business, like keeps me grounded and kind of on undergone, but also motivated in a way that feels good. And I think the differences, I have sometimes just been kind of driven by fear, which is really different to feeling good about your goals and being motivated by them. Before I get into it, I want to announce two things. So thank you to everyone who came for the intro to branding workshop that was really good fun. And like I said, I’m going to run more of these. But the next thing that’s coming up is the free virtual business retreat and the 24th and 25th of July. And I’ll link to that in the show notes, I have planned a really beautiful we can pack with workshops, and co working spaces and little corners to get to know each other and maybe find people that are in a similar path as you are. So I really hope you can make that. And the other announcement is that my programme crate and launch is starting on July 5. And it’s an early bird pricing till this Friday, June VAP $280 instead of 240, which is the price it’s going to be afterwards. And this is a pre recorded four module course that you can take you in your own time plus, there will be four weekly sessions on Monday that are live on zoom, where you can ask questions and get gentle group accountability and feedback and kind of just be guided through the process. So the idea is that through create and launch, you’ll be developing your own first evergreen product. And that could be a class or course or a download. And I think that that’s something that many people I know have been wanting for a long time but haven’t really gotten around to and in my last podcast episode, which you may have heard, I talked about what kinds of classes or ideas might work as an evergreen, I think not everything does, you know, there’s definitely things that I think are better done live together. But there are also really beautiful things that you can teach, that are always available. And that that could make a difference to both your community and your business and the way you rent things. So if that’s interesting to you, I would love to have you and I’ll link to that in the show notes as well. Alright, so five tips to stay motivated and create supportive structures. The first one is to really know yourself and why you’re doing this. And maybe that sounds like common sense. But in my experience, it really isn’t. It took me years to really get to know myself as a small business owner with the things that I find easy and hard, the things that I need and the things that I’m good at, and also the things that I really need support with. So what has helped me to now be in a place where I’m much clearer on what my zone of genius is, and isn’t, is to have regular reflective practices. So, for me, that’s journaling. I also like working with the Tarot, I have really wonderful business friends, shout out to those amazing people that are happy to talk about my business with me, and reflect. And so that is really helpful for me in observing my own patterns. And over time, kind of better understanding what drives me, and what I need in order to succeed. And I think that’s such an important mindset or approach that you really want to set yourself up for success, right? Like you want to create a structure that makes you feel good, and that makes your work or your goals doable for you. So that might not be journaling terror or anything like that for you. But you need to find the thing that helps you stay connected with yourself and your experiences in your work, and also your bigger picture. So for me, it’s also really important to stay engaged with why I’m doing this. And of course, my motivations are fluid change over time. But there’s again, certain patterns, I think, that have emerged over the years. So I really love my freedom. I love working from home having a flexible schedule. I really love working creatively, I work with like minded people who I love. And I get to be a human and experiment and play. And that feels really important to me as well. And it’s also really clear contrast to the jobs and employment I had in my 20s. So that drives me and that’s really important to me. And another aspect is that I really enjoy supporting people in creating working conditions that work for them as well. That feels really rewarding to me to see people succeed and build businesses that make them happy and support them financially.
And then It’s not to be underestimated. I think it’s easy to think that we’re all just driven by money. But actually, you know that is important is super important to have your basic needs met and to feel secure and safe in the world. But beyond that, it’s also really important to feel rewarded by the work and the change that you see yourself making to other people’s lives. The next tip is to break your goals into doable chunks. And I also wish that I had followed that advice sooner. I’ve always loved journaling. And I always love kind of articulating my bigger picture goals or make like a five year plan. But I have always been really good in breaking that down into smaller doable chunks. And this year in March, I will I had an accident in December last year. And then in March, I took a five week break of Kleinberg. And that’s been a real eye opener to me, because there’s been so many things in my business that had been kind of thinking about but not really acting on for years. So one major part was me re recording my evergreen classes, for example, which I did, and it was really great. And it really helped me to utilise these five weeks that I had, without bigger client projects to really have a beautiful colour coded exit sheet where I wrote both about my big five year plans and then broke that down into one year plans and then broke that down into months, and also organise the tasks in a way that made sense to me. So Divi an example with the course creation, my overall goal was to be able to offer a wider range of of products and services, because I obviously always knew not everyone can afford working with me one on one, and I don’t want to turn anyone away, that doesn’t feel good. I also, of course, enjoy making some additional income. I love teaching, I actually really enjoy making these videos. And so those were kind of the the overall goals there. And then I broke that down into smaller chunks like doing research around what has changed in Divi that I’m creating a lesson plan, researching the software that I want to use for my recording and editing this time around, which is different to the first time I did them. Then I researched different quiz platforms. And then I started recording, and I broke the videos that I recorded into smaller channels. So I did about three or four a day. And then I pass it on to someone else to be captioned. But I edited that when I got the bag and to kind of also work on the branding and the captions and all that, then I created graphics for each of them. So as you can see, I could go on and on. But there’s always several pieces. And I think just writing down I want to create a course is probably going to feel a little bit daunting to you say when you usually have a day job or other commitments or client work that you’re doing. Just having this like list that says create a course is just to wait to actually get something done when you have two days to yourself. And you want to utilise that time towards that goal. So breaking it down into smaller chunks is really just not to be underestimated. And it’s powerful simplicity. But I also find helpful sometimes is reverse engineering. So there’s just the idea that you set a bigger goal, and then you reverse the steps and trace them back to see where you land in the present day. So if you want to be at a certain point one year for now, what needs to happen 11 months from now, and then 10, nine, eight, and so forth. You might also want to dig deeper into your motivations, if that’s not totally vivid, vividly clear to you right now with bigger y questions. So maybe you’ll say something like my goal in the next year is to make $2,000 a month from my business. So you can ask why, you know, why is that? And then you might say, Well, in that case, I’ll be able to quit my day job. And then you can again say why is that important to you? And you might then say, because I actually really want to fully commit to this work, and I love it and I’m ready to let go of my job in that timeframe. And then you can again say why is that going to feel good to you. And you might say something like, I’m just ready for that kind of freedom. I want to work from home, I believe in my idea. I want to make this happen in a year. So this is a super generic, possibly a little bit cliche example. But I just wanted to illustrate what it could look like to ask more why questions and get clearer on your bigger picture and then break that down. I love working with both mind maps that I draw by hand and extra sheets and to break things down. But whatever you choose, just have a think about what feels playful and fun to you and then really commit to that. My third tip is to track your energy, time and money in a way that feels motivating.
And I didn’t do this at all in the first years of my business. I kind of randomly That’s my prices, and never really clocked how much time I was spending on each project or each client or, you know, whatever we anything, I just had very vague ideas. And that really didn’t have me to make clear and intentional decisions in my business. So even though that may sound boring to set up initially, once you have a system up and running, and that could be again, just a simple excel sheet where you’re tracking exactly how many hours are you spending on admin each month, how much time you’re spending on social media, podcasting, sending newsletters, other kinds of marketing, client support, and so forth, and so forth. If clearer you will be on what is actually working in your business, what you need to charge and where you might need to get support. And I think, especially when you’re looking to feel more motivated, and you want to create support structures, having this kind of understanding of the numbers in your business, where your energy and time goes, is really important, because you’re otherwise always feeling like you’re treading water, you’re kind of maybe signing up for courses or classes, but never really making time to implement the stuff that could really make a big difference in your business. And it’s easier said than done. I know that again, I just want to say that it has taken me years to be in this place where it really easily track all of that. it’s second nature to me now, I don’t even think about it anymore. But when I do make decisions, I look at that sheet, and I’m very clear on what I need to do and what feels good for me. I think, yeah, with that, it might also be nice to to make a commitment to inform your pricing with those numbers that you’ve been tracking. So like I mentioned, it’s really hard to said, you know, your prices when you don’t know how long something is actually going to take tell you. And I think when it comes to staying motivated, feeling resentful is something that’s really unhelpful, right? I know, in the beginning, I often set my prices way too low, and just wanted to get the client or excite someone, you know, make that deal because I had to pay rent. And then towards the end of the project, as it became bigger and bigger and more drawn out, I realised I really hadn’t charged enough, I became resentful, I still showed up, of course, and I tried my absolute best to complete the project and make it great. But overall, I just felt really defeating. And I’m happier now that I have, you know, figures in which I can ground those decisions around pricing that I’m making. My fourth tip is and you’ve probably have heard me say this many times before is to make time to work on your business rather than just in your business and to create structures that work for you. And with the structure piece, I don’t want to be too prescriptive, because I think it can look, you know, it’s just different for everyone. There’s no way I could ever say you know, Monday needs to be you’re working on your business day. And that’s just what it is. I know that’s not the reality for so many people. But if you find yourself signing up for classes, or taking courses or joining communities, and you just don’t get from from them what you need, or you don’t feel that you’re moving forward in your business, or you feel like weeks and months passing by without things really tangibly getting easier, then something to look at is really kind of Do you have enough structure? And how can you create that for yourself? For me, it looks like locking regular time in my calendar each week. And that’s just an hour or two. But then also, I tried to keep the last week of each month of client calls, so that I have a whole week of just kind of catching up with any kind of work that hasn’t been done that month. And otherwise, just working on on my business, you know, doing bookkeeping admin, reaching out to other podcasts, planning my next launch, thinking about marketing, sending newsletters, that kind of stuff. And I find that when I try to do too much of that stuff kind of in between teaching and client work, it just gets messy. And I always prioritise my clients, of course, because ever committed to someone else. And so the things that I want to do for my business and on my business, are kind of always, you know, we’re sorry, that’s my dog, they kind of always the last thing or the first thing to go when I’m lacking time. And so having these like committed chunks of time is really important. And the same is true. I think when I try to learn something new, I sign up for a summer SEO camp, which I really enjoy. But I’m really just noticing how I absolutely have to make time to actually do the work watch recordings in them and what I’m learning there, otherwise, there’s no point and I have committed to to that right. It is important to me, and I’m excited to learn something new. But that’s not going to happen if I don’t commit to regular chunks of time to really show up for this.
Other things that might help you with that. You know, in addition to blocking time in your calendar would be maybe joining co working spaces, maybe finding an accountability buddy or a small mastermind which you can Create for free, and I have a podcast episode quite like a year back. So imagine talking on just that. But maybe you just want to talk with a friend, maybe you want to hire a coach, maybe you want to, I don’t know, you know, create yourself, email reminders or something, but just give yourself both the structure and the flexibility you need, I think what I really want to kind of hold here is that we need to set ourselves up for success. And if you’re too strict, if you say, you know, block a whole day a week, and you just can’t make that happen, it’s going to start feeling frustrating over time, right? So I think for me, there always has to be a balance between commitment and the flexibility that I need. And even if I move those chunks of time that I’m working on my business around, sometimes at the end of the month, I always know that I have made good progress on the overall picture, I learned something new, I developed an idea further I connected with people. And that feels really important to me. And you really need that in addition to the ongoing creative work, which I also really enjoy. And and finally be clear on what support you need and really asked for it. And so I know again, that’s easier said than done, I find asking for help really hard. But if you are someone who struggles with a particular aspect of your business, be that building your website or reaching out to people overcoming fear of rejection on social media, making a marketing plan, or just generally getting organised and sticking to a structure and a schedule that you want to commit to, then it’s important to own that, right. Like if this is a pattern and it shows up for you over a longer period of time, then I really hope that you can meet that with self compassion, because we’ve been through so much this past year. And we all have different access to resources and energy levels and time. We all have other commitments in our lives. But yeah, if you if you can, and you notice this pattern, then really own that I think that is something that can really set you free. And there’s no shame in saying Actually, I love my work. I love being creative, but I just I’m just know that I need outside support to stay motivated because I otherwise won’t get done what I need to get done. And that’s really, you know, the first step that you can take towards making that happen. And that support of course doesn’t have to be paid. But it could also be a trade you could make a commitment to learn something take a class or course you or you could hire someone and so yeah, you know maybe I have a friend or someone who wants to be in some kind of accountability arrangement with you but I really hope that you find what you need this summer. And this is my dog again I was there and they you Yeah, you get this feeling of forward momentum and excitement that you may be firsthand when you when you decided to start a business and really to stay connected and grounded in that bigger picture and the why. Thank you so much for listening. I hope you got something useful out of this again, a reminder to please join the free summer retreat at the end of July if you like and also to consider joining creating launch which starts on July 5 if you want to create an evergreen product

#60 How to create and launch a small evergreen product 

#60 How to create and launch a small evergreen product 

Hey friends,

I’m sending you a sweet combination of how to guide and pep talk all about small evergreen products. I promise they are super fun and might be a much easier summer project than a full blown course.

Here is what I shared:

  • Why small evergreen classes are awesome
  • How to find the right topic
  • Deciding on a format that works for you and your audience
  • How to market your creation in an enjoyable and easy way

I also invited you to my free virtual summer retreat, you can sign up here: https://yarrowdigital.com/summer-retreat/

More info and the sign up for my free intro to branding workshop is here: https://yarrowdigital.com/intro-to-branding-workshop/

and finally here is my Questioning Social Media class if you want a cute example for a small evergreen class: https://yarrowdigital.com/questioning-social-media-class/

Enjoy!

Listen to the DIY Small Business Podcast

on Apple Podcast // Stitcher // Spotify // Soundcloud

 

⋒ Hi, my name is Yarrow and I am your host.

My Embodied Business podcast explores what it means to build a small business with integrity, joy and anti capitalist values. I interview other small business owners and offer solo episodes in which I am answering questions around tech, strategy, more ethical marketing and creative livelihoods.

You can learn more about my web design, tech support, mentoring and community offerings at YarrowDigital.com

Sign up for my newsletter below if you'd like to hear from me about once a month! ⋒

Transcript

Hey everyone, this is Yarrow with a little pre intro. So I really enjoyed recording this episode. And I got a lot of feedback from it. And there’s also been a lot of people who have this year taken my questioning social media class, and enjoyed it and had questions about that. So in the joy of all of that, and the sharing, and also the things that we discuss in the embody business community this month, I decided to offer something called create and launch, which is going to be a full week live programme starting on July 5, in which I’m going to lead you through the process of creating your own class, or course. And so yeah, you will get access to all the pre recorded videos, there’s going to be about 16 of them. And I’m going to share my screen and really take you step by step through everything that I’ve done. And I’m doing at the moment. And then we’ll also have weekly live classes on a Monday UK evening. And those are there for questions for getting feedback for meeting other like minded people that we recorded in case you can’t make it, I think that should be really fun. Because at the moment, I’m teaching the web design adventure in the same four week process. And it’s just such a joy to see that like the short bursts of live classes, and people going through an experience together can make it so so much easier to actually do the thing. So if you are listening to this, because you’ve been wanting to create your own class, or evergreen course for a while, then I really invite you to check that out. It is on an early bird pricing for $180 until June 18, which happens to be the date I’m having surgery again. And to be honest, I just kind of like the idea of knowing that I am supported in my work in that way. Maybe that’s a vulnerable and weird thing to say I don’t think so actually. But I’ve just been really enjoying teaching this class this month. And I know this is going to be something that I’m only going to look forward to before I’m diving back into design work with clients later in the month. So yeah, please consider that. I think it’s going to feel really great. At the end of August, early September to have a class ready to go. As the world is kind of shifting into this back to school vibe. That’s often happening around that time of the year. So yeah, and thank you so much for listening, and we’re gonna share the episode with you now. Hey, everyone, my name is Yarrow, and you’re listening to the embodied business podcast. I’m excited for this episode. Creating small evergreen products is something that I’ve really enjoyed. And I’m really excited for more people to get into this as well. And I hope that by the end of this episode, you’ll feel clear and confident about what the next steps are. Before I dive deeper, I want to share two exciting updates. The first one is that I’m offering a free summer retreat on a 24th of trend and 25th of July. That’s a weekend and it will be the afternoon and UK time. So I think from kind of two to seven. UK time. So that should cover a broad range of timezones, hopefully, at least for some of the sessions that are we hosting, and I think it’s really going to be a lot of fun. I want to kind of hold a space for people to come together and really implement something bigger, right? I feel that we are we are, you know, we have a difficult year behind us. And very often people have found that they haven’t had a chance to kind of engage and work with the bigger picture or the bigger vision that they’re holding for the work, which makes total sense. And it’s also the reason why I want us to come together and kind of share notes, feel less alone, and have this kind of gentle accountability of a group to feel that we have a sense of forward movement again. So I’ll be offering some short meditations that I guided some journaling. I’m going to share a workshop on my new root bloom roots and bloom framework, which is a really lovely value based framework of he has developing things in a really in a sustainable and regenerative way. I think I’m waffling but I am excited about
it. And I think it will be really useful to that with that. So if you feel called please join us. I’ll link to that in the show notes. It’s free. You’ll get to know really beautiful, amazing people some of which I might embody business community and I’ll share a lot of tools And we’ll also have some co working time, so that you can really implement what we’re talking about. And it’s not just another workshop that you come to feel overwhelmed by, and then kind of forget about. So yeah, it’s gonna be great. The second update is that I’m offering a free intro to branding workshop on June 7, as promised, a free monthly workshops are a thing again, teaching about web design as an intro last month was really, really fun. And so yeah, there’ll be lots more topics coming up. And you can get on my newsletter list to hear about all of them. But for now, June 7 is the next one coming up. All right, let’s get into it. So how to create and launch a small evergreen product,
I want to begin by talking about why I love them so much, and why you might want to have them in your business as well.
So firstly, they are relatively small or low commitment, both in you making it but also in people buying it. So if you haven’t created a bigger course, yet, they’re just such a beautiful thing to kind of play with and experiment with and invite people to support your way, do your work in that way. And even if you have a bigger course, I had bigger courses before I had a small class. And they’re just really fun to add. And it’s really nice, I think, to be able that was my dog, to be able to meet people at different stages in that openness to working with you. That was a long word sentence. But what I’m trying to say is, you know, maybe you have a bigger quiz already. And it’s not quite right for everyone in your audience. And maybe having a smaller evergreen product, like a class or workbook could be a nice way of offering something different. And if you haven’t got a bigger quercia add them, you know, even better than that will be a stepping stone for you, me maybe developing one in the future. Another thing I love about them is that they give us a chance to teach something in a kind of bite sized, but more in depth in social media kind of way, right. So I think, I think we’ve come become used to kind of receiving information have through scrolling through a feed. And I think there’s something beautiful and taking kind of one step forward. And committing to something like an hour long class, where we’re going a little bit deeper. And we’re really getting to pay attention and to learn something that will will integrate into our lives. And so a small class where you’re teaching something that you’re really passionate about, it’s such a great way of doing that. I also think that this is a nice way for you to practice teaching. And again, if you haven’t gone gotten a bigger quiz yet, then teaching just one small class might be a great way for you to get a feeling for how people receive the information that you’re sharing. And how you can maybe tailored to what would be easiest or most accessible for people to receive. And that’s obviously so unique for each of us. And finally, it can also be a really nice gift. So if you are have a if you have a podcast, for example, and you want to invite someone that you don’t know yet, you could say, Hey, you know, I’ve been following your work I really enjoyed, I would love to talk to you on my podcast. But for you to have a chance to also get to know my work and decide if this is right for you. Here’s a free code to my class. It’s just a nice gesture, you know, they might or might not might need it or would have paid for it. But that’s not the point. You’re just being kind and having like a smaller class that you can easily give away for like that, I think is a really beautiful thing to have on the internet, basically. All right, so so these are the reasons why I think this is a great idea. The next thing I want to talk about is finding a topic. So here are a few questions that I would invite you to ask yourself, if you’re not sure about what your topic would be. The first one is what do you get questions about all the time? So thinking about how people engage with you on social media, what kind of questions you get a real live, what people maybe ask you at a dinner party about your work. What do you really love talking about? or What do you wish you had known five years ago? So maybe this is something people don’t even know to ask about. That could be a thing. But then that might be worth thinking about your younger self and how you came to this work, and what you just really wish you had known sooner and that could be the class that you make. I also think it’s a great idea to ask what is one thing that someone could maybe make in a weekend with your guidance. So an example is my smaller cause, on branding with Canva which teaches people how to Put colour palettes together how to work with design elements and fonts and how to get started creating graphics in Canva. And so that’s something that you can do in a weekend. So it’s a smaller class. And it’s really practical. And so, yeah, think of along those lines, like what could you share with people that they could implement in a weekend that would make a tangible difference to them? And then finally, of course, what are you most passionate about? Right? So I’m sure there’s a story of how you came to do the work that you are doing today that’s really close to your heart and really sit with that question, the story and the tools that kind of has helped you get there along the way, and how could you share them.
The next thing you probably want to think about is the right format. And I really want to say here that it doesn’t have to be video, it especially doesn’t have to be video where you’re facing the camera. So I think that is a big barrier for a lot of people because it is, you know, it can be fun, maybe it is fun for you. But what many people feel some hesitation around getting in front of the camera. And it can be a little bit more work of editing and scripting and getting it right, that kind of stuff. So if you feel nervous about this, just think about a different format. And that could be audio, I think there’s a lot of topics where audio is a perfectly beautiful choice. In fact, I love learning through audio, and sometimes even prefer to video, when there isn’t something that I need to see, so that I can understand it visually, then I would much prefer listening in to it in my garden, with my headphones on looking at the sky and maybe pottering around a bit because I’m someone who learns much better and movement and kind of like being outside and doing something physically physically than really sitting still and staring at the screen. So I think you know, that might not be everyone. But this is something interesting to think about how would you want to present your material and doesn’t really have to be video. Another way of doing it is to have a video but to screenshare slide. So this is something that I do for my web design course where I’m either sharing kind of behind the scenes of how I’m doing things in WordPress, or I have slides that I’m reading off of, and people can kind of follow along with them. But they could also just listen if they wanted to. And that makes it much easier for me at least to stay on track. And in terms of what I want to talk about. But also to not worry too much about what I’m looking like in that moment. And if I have the right flattering camera angle, and that kind of stuff. So the slides kind of really helped me to talk about what I want to go through. But I don’t read often word by word, because I know my shed. And so just need these pointers as kind of like a framework to make sure I’m not not waffling into a different into the distance, which I sometimes do. And yeah, they’re really fun and easy to make for me. And then finally, you could also of course, make a workbook you know or create something otherwise visual, like maybe you want to present like a photo series that teaching people something or a guided meditation or a visualisation or some other kind of how to guide. So don’t limit yourself by the examples that I’m giving you here, right. So thinking about accessibility, as I’ve already kind of touched on can of course being important. And I think it’s really important to me to look at SS accessibility from from like a holistic, multi dimensional viewpoint. Because we we want to make sure that people who want to work with us can access our work. But we also want to make sure that we can sustainably work in our businesses. And it looks like different things, you know, at different points, of course. So yeah, think about this, both from your audience and from your own perspective. And there’s, of course, also practical things that you can do. So for example, I use a software called weed to caption my videos, if you create audio, you can transcribe it. There’s automated services for that now they’re pretty affordable. So yeah, there we think about what your audience need and how it would be easier for them to access what you have to share. Here’s the technology that I use. So I use the QuickTime Player to record video audio. And then like I said, I use read to add captions, and that’s written or spelled v Ed, and I had like a month long subscription and got all my videos done for the new courses in March.
And that was great. It was a really good experience. And then I sometimes use iMovie to tweak and cut my videos and then I have my courses on pod Yeah, to actually deliver the thing, another work around or not work around, it’s just another solution, I guess that’s free. Because podio isn’t free. podio is great in lots of ways, I really recommend it. But if you have WordPress site and you don’t have a budget for software, you could set up a WooCommerce digital product. And then you could integrate that for free with mailer, light and accept payments through PayPal. So the process would then be you have a sales page on your WordPress site, this links to your WooCommerce product, people check out through the connection between WooCommerce and melee, they get an automated welcome email from mailer light. And that gives them access to your thing. And that could be, for example, an embedded video on a password protected site. So any welcome email would say something like, Hey, thank you so much for taking my class. Here’s how you access it, this is the password, this is how you can work through it, he is maybe an additional PDF. Good luck, basically, you know, I would probably also talk about how excited you feel that people you know, get to experience a transformation, what they can expect as an outcome, maybe just to get them a little bit more hyped up even. So yeah, it’s actually really much simpler than you probably think. So there’s lots of different free ways of doing this as again, just one example. And obviously, launching is a big topic. So I just want to kind of cover my most important tips here to again, hopefully make you feel that you can totally do this. I think what’s important to think about is your content. And I would recommend that you batch that. So you could maybe say okay, I’m creating this class. And I’m going to, I’m going to prepare five different Instagram posts and maybe going to go live twice. And I’m going to send three newsletters just as an example, right, this could look totally different doesn’t matter. But really plan this out, create a super simple excel sheet and name where you’re going to mention this new thing and where and how often and with that, really remember that people have to see something many, many times until they decide, I think a really tricky beginner’s mistake is to mention it once and then be like waves that I taught, I told them about it, and they didn’t buy it. So maybe they just don’t want it. That is not how it works. Okay, I’m so sorry. This is super annoying for introverts, I know. But it’s really not how the internet works, you have to tell people several times and you can tell them about different angles and perspectives, you can begin by telling them why you made it and then you could tell them about a testimonial. And then you tell them the kind of outcome that you seeing people have after the class. And then he could tell them, I did something else, right? Like you, you can be creative. Just make sure that you’re in the right headspace when you’re batching your launch content and make sure that you’re committing to a schedule, and that you either schedule those things in so that it can go wrong, or that you block time in your calendar to share about them as you have committed to. I would also recommend that you make space for imposter syndrome that might come up. My my experience was when I first recorded my fire, my first language is almost five years ago, now I put so much energy into the production. When it came to launching, I was just exhausted, and I didn’t want to talk about it anymore. And I just felt super shy. And I wish I had anticipated that and put things in place for me to kind of, you know, catch that feeling a little bit, I guess. So one thing I really love having now is a feedback folder where I save all the emails with positive feedback that I got. And when I feel a bit nervous about sharing something new, I go through the folder and I remind myself that my work matters. And that has helped people and also that people have agency if they don’t want to do it, they won’t do it. And that’s fine, you know, so there’s really nothing to worry about. And finally, another thing that you can do if you know that this is something that might come up for you is just to get an accountability buddy. So someone who really loves your work, and who can exchange positive feedback with you. That doesn’t mean you can’t also share constructive criticism, of course, but find someone that you feel really comfortable and safe with who will cheer you on to actually say your thing when you’re ready to share it. Alright, so one last thing I want to talk about is pricing. And since we’re talking about small evergreen products here, my main takeaway is do not overthink this. Okay? Because I think the main thing if you’re just trying this out and you haven’t run a course before, is just that it feels fun and you are feeling that you’re being
respected and seen and that people acknowledge the work that you’ve put into this and that Again, could look like totally different things for you, right? So I don’t want ever want to put a number on this year, it just really depends on how long you spend learning this thing. You know, how much have you invested in getting to the point where you can teach this? How much have you put into the production of the class? How many spots Do you expect to sell? And what do you need in order to feel safe and appreciated. So, I have recorded a class called questioning social media. And it’s currently $13. And it feels like a really fun and playful number. It’s not a big commitment. On either side, I’ve sold quite a few spots where it and people really liked it, and made me happy. It took just like half a day to make. Everyone has having fun. So that’s great. And I really, really enjoyed that. So yeah, of course, if you are feeling worried about pricing, I totally understand I think there isn’t like a right or wrong way of doing it. Well, maybe there’s I don’t know. Sorry. So anyway, what I’m trying to say is, remember, there’s always options, right, you could have a base price and say, once a quarter, I’m giving two spots away when offering a scholarship. And I would recommend that you think about boundaries around that. Scholarships are free sports are amazing. And I think economic justice is really, really important. But I think it’s also important that you’re not becoming resentful and that you’re not feeling pressured into just giving your class away randomly to absolutely everyone, right. You might have a freebie for your newsletter, which is a different thing. But you deserve to be compensated, and it’s okay to maybe say, you know, I’m giving two spots away a quarter or I have this little form here that you can fill in if you need a scholarship. And I’ll get back to you. I think those are totally, totally valid things to do. And finally, I want to say I think what’s really going to motivate you to follow through with this whole process is to make it a part of your business plan. And to see it as part of your bigger picture. So I created the questioning social media class, for example, because I really, it has been a beautiful experience for me to leave social media, I want to talk about this with more people. So I want to be part of this dialogue. And I want all of us to feel that we have options that may be sometimes social media is right for us. And sometimes maybe isn’t. But really, that our mental health is really important as small business owners and that we get to express ourselves and share about our work in a way that really works for us. So that’s something I’m super passionate about. And also, I had an accident in December last year, I’m gonna have surgery again next month, I really need to kind of take it easy this year and make sure that I have enough time and space to heal. And so recording these kinds of classes at a time where I have enough energy and it suits me is a really nice way of making a bit of extra income. And so this is a part of my bigger picture business plan. Yeah. And it might be a part of yours as well. So thank you so much for listening. I really hope this has been helpful. I would love to see your cars out in the world. And also again, a reminder about the summer retreat, and the free branding workshop that comes up on June 7. So check the show notes for that and please join us if you like and you can of course also invite your friends by

#59 When is it time to give up on a business?

#59 When is it time to give up on a business?

Hey loves,

can you believe it is May now? I’m being reminded to follow my own rhythms and seasons every day at the moment!

Part of that is making space for contractions and grief when it’s needed, which can sometimes include asking if it’s time to give up on a business or an idea. Someone asked how we know when it’s time today and I loved that questions so much that I recorded a whole episode about it.

This is, I hope, a pep-talk to un-shame the act of letting go when something doesn’t feel right anymore while also building resilience to keep going when it’s just a rough patch on the way to softer times.

I hope it helps!

Love,

Yarrow

P.S. Here is the Web Design Adventure I mentioned: https://yarrowdigital.com/web-design-adventure-course/

Listen to the DIY Small Business Podcast

on Apple Podcast // Stitcher // Spotify // Soundcloud

 

⋒ Hi, my name is Yarrow and I am your host.

My Embodied Business podcast explores what it means to build a small business with integrity, joy and anti capitalist values. I interview other small business owners and offer solo episodes in which I am answering questions around tech, strategy, more ethical marketing and creative livelihoods.

You can learn more about my web design, tech support, mentoring and community offerings at YarrowDigital.com

Sign up for my newsletter below if you'd like to hear from me about once a month! ⋒

Transcript

Hey,
everyone, my name is Yarrow and you’re listening to the embodied business podcast. It’s a rainy Monday afternoon, and it’s made, which totally blows my mind to be honest. And someone in the embody business community asked this morning, when is a time to give up? Or like, How do I know when I should just let it go? And that question touched me so deeply. I’ve been thinking about this all day. And it really surprised me to consider how rarely we ever talk about that. And I consider the inbody business community like a really plays in which people sometimes share quite vulnerably and are really honest with each other, which I so appreciate. And yet, it’s not often that we really kind of pause and say, am I doing the right thing? Or is it time to let this idea go? Or this whole business, go and do something else.
And as you know, I love being a cheerleader for people. I just love throwing encouragement around like confetti, and I, yeah, that’s just a really big an important part of what I’m here to do. But I don’t want to turn away from these more difficult questions. And my hope is also that when we look at them, and really dig deeper, and kind of untangle this a little bit, it maybe becomes less scary. You know, I think sometimes when stuff is difficult in our work, having this question hanging over our heads, is actually harder than really confronting it and saying yes or no to it, or actually sometimes letting go and admitting that something maybe has become too difficult. So yeah, I want to talk about that today. Before I do just one small announcement a week from now, on May 10, we’re starting the web design adventure. And this is a course that’s evergreen, then that means it’s always available for you to take when you’re ready. But on May 10, in addition to that, I’m starting a live round, where we’re meeting every Monday, football for Wolf, four, four weeks, to go through this experience together. And the course really teaches you everything you need to know to create a beautiful WordPress website for your business without the headache and the waste of time of watching dozens of YouTube videos, I’m sharing my screen, I’m showing you everything I know, and hopefully sharing some really valuable tools for work for your website. And also for an enjoyment of tag, that’s really important to me. And so if you want that group accountability can join us still, I’m going to link to that in the show notes. And I would love to have you. Okay, so now more about this question. When is it time to give up in your business? I think the first sub question I want to ask is, why do we think about wanting to give up? Like, what does that mean? I think sometimes for me, there’s been moments where this idea of giving up has actually felt like a relief in my body where things have just been really stressful. And I thought, you know, if I just release and surrender to the fact that this isn’t working right now, I might feel really liberated afterwards. And I’m really happy that I didn’t choose to give up in that moment. And I push through but but my situation is, you know, my own situation. And I think there’s also been moments where I did give up on things, not my business as a whole, but some ideas that I had or projects that just became too tedious to work in. And they did feel really good to let go. So this past year, obviously has been difficult in that in absolutely big questions. And some of those were really illuminating and beautifully clarity given giving, but there wasn’t there, there was not a tonne of stability or a certainty for many of us, and especially economically, I think that has played out in a lot of businesses needing to radically adapt and do things very different, different differently than they had gotten used to doing them. And so yeah, if you’re sitting with this question right now, do you feel like giving up sometimes? What does that mean to you? Does it feel promising in a way? Or does it feel really sad to think that maybe you can’t sustain this business? What comes up as a reason? Is it mostly money? Is it maybe health or maybe overwhelmed with all the questions that you need to decide on every day? Or is it social media that’s weighing you down? Do you need support? Are you maybe not feeling creatively fulfilled? I think it’s really worth taking a moment to dig really deep into that and to ask if that is Something that you can identify here. And if there’s anything that you can put in place for yourself, that would maybe ease that, at least for now. And I think all of these reasons are so valid. And and so often we don’t really talk about them enough, right. And so I just want to say for transparency that the first two years and I’m six years in now has been really financially difficult for me. And I wasn’t talking about that at the time, because I wanted to be seen as a successful entrepreneur. And I wanted to know that my clients felt really confident about working with me. I needed them to know that they needed to pay my invoices at in a timely manner. But I, I wouldn’t have that at the time, I think to really be fully honest about how much I was flying by the seat of my pants, is that T
expression? Is it? I’m not sure now. But anyway, I have this little yellow notebook that I was using at the time. And, yeah, that was, I think that was the first year of my business that I was working with that particular notebook. And it’s just for my business dreaming. So I had a separate journal. And it’s mainly really full of ideas. But it’s also full of all these, like, very detailed calculations of how much money was coming in, and how much was going out. And when I look at these pages, now I see them dripping with anxiety, you know, and it always worked in the end. And that’s, I feel so lucky for that. And there’s particular reasons, I think that I will expand on of why that worked for me. And that have nothing to do about my idea of being better than anyone elses. But anyway, I won’t go ahead of myself. Now, I just wanted to say that I, I know the feeling of deep financial uncertainty. And I know it’s a really tricky place to be creative from. And I just wish for everyone to have the security of knowing that your basic needs will always be mad, I truly believe that all of us could be so much more effective in what we’re trying to do in a world if that was a given. If we had a basic universal income, for example, I think that that investment on a societal level would be so worth it, because it will be a huge waste of so many people’s shoulders, and so much more creativity could come forward if that were the case. So just know that if you are struggling financial anxiety, you’re not alone. And and this is a valid fear to have. And, and it’s tricky to, to Yeah, further business in this way. And there’s lots of other reasons for why sometimes people consider wanting to give up. The next question I want to ask you is what is the story of wanting to give up? And what I mean by that is maybe even sitting down with your journal and ask yourself, what would that look like? Like, what what would you do? If you decided to give up next week? What would you do? Would you take your site down? Would you delete your newsletter list? Would you tell someone or everyone on social media, and then delete your profile? Would you maybe just take your booking link to your calendar down for now and then see how that feels. And if you want to return to things a few months from now, I mean, really just allowing yourself that freedom to imagine that for a moment, maybe that’s helpful. But maybe that’s also just really sad. And you feel a sense of grief of this idea of taking you upside down. And that’s actually really beautiful information, because it tells you that
you still have
so much love for what you do, even if it’s difficult right now. And there’s a big part of you that doesn’t want to let go just now. And that’s really good to know. Right? And I think that’s also not a given because so often when things are stressful, it’s hard to feel connected to our intuition and to really kind of in a very playful and open way to know that we would feel aggrieved about this idea. And then maybe there’s also external stories that we have taken on around what it means to give up. Maybe you’ve been told that you’re a quitter. I know I have I’ve I’ve been in too many so many different schools when I was a teenager. So I went to two different primary schools. And then I was in three different secondary schools. And apart from the change of primary school, that was always my choice that I initiated. So I left schools because I was unhappy and I thought it would be better elsewhere. And my parents were mostly supportive of that choice. So it kind of worked out that way. But I felt like such a loser about it like there was a part of me that knew I wasn’t in the right place. plays and that may be something as will go better for me. And, and then, you know, in a way that did turn out to be true, but I still felt like I was such a quitter for not sticking it out and just putting up with this shit like the bullying and just the staff basically. And I think they can feel true for many of us and actually think that it’s also true that very few of us have had the chance as young people to try different things out and to really get to know ourselves in our work without any pressure. And again, that’s something I really wish for everyone. And I know for myself that sometimes, you know, I started this business when I was 29 or 28, something like that. And an A that’s so young, right? I’m 34 five now, and I just looked back and I was like, I just feel like what I was still in my 20s like what did I expect of myself that I would know all these things without have ever, ever having done them? Like how would I know them. And yet at the time, I already felt late, I felt that I had tried too many different jobs. In my early 20s, I had been an HR manager, I worked in a theatre, I’d been a nanny for more than a decade or a babysitter, I’d been in a pair, I studied different things. I funded it all in it shoestring so I never really had like a super stable lifestyle, I lived in so many different houses and different places. I never really had savings and and it was all kind of cobbled together. But it was also really beautiful. And I really needed all these experiences. And I look back at them now with so much more compassion and understanding for my choices. By the way, I plug here for the net New Relic with with whom I’m I’ve been working on the past few months and who really helped me, ah, gosh, and so many levels, but to let go of some shame and to really understand better who I am and why I made those choices and who I have yet to become. It’s just been so beautiful to work with her. And that relig Reddy, co creative century calm. She’s so great. Anyway. So So all this to say I really get that maybe the possibility of giving up feels like being a failure. And maybe there’s more here that we can untangle about whether that’s really true, because from what I’ve seen, or where I stand now giving up sometimes it’s really just about acknowledging that something isn’t right for us, and that there’s something better out there that will enjoy doing much more and like what could be more beautiful than acknowledging that right? But that isn’t true for all of us. And, and that’s okay, you know, maybe
there’s just a part of your business right now that you really want to change. And maybe it’s just a matter of restructuring your week changing a business model, charging differently, maybe charging more that would make things so much easier for you. And then what are the stories around that that’s so important to know and to ask, and something that I find is really helpful. And I’m shaming with whatever comes up as you ask yourself these things is to say it out loud to someone else. So maybe if you have a friend or someone who knows, you know that that also runs a business that you could maybe talk to speak to them and say, Can we maybe share that really difficult stuff that’s going on in our businesses right now? And can we maybe admit to each other that sometimes we’ve been thinking about giving up, that would be really helpful for me right now. I think that’s great. That’s so beautiful. And the next thing that I want to offer you, if you are on the spot is to go back to an episode that I’ve recorded. Last year, I think, and it’s called where to begin when you’re starting out. Lots of people have said they really loved that one, which and it’s so simple, really. But I will recap very quickly what it is about. It’s essentially about creating the tools to list exercise. And then the first list you would list everything that you need from your business. So for many people, the first thing they need is just financial stability or basic level. But they might also need a sense of freedom of creative expression or flexibility of knowing that their mental health is supported of, of just a feeling doable. I mean, that’s always a good one is that. So you just list all these things, and then you order them per priority. And you just see what is most important to you right now what do you need to feel safe. And then the second list is a list of everything that you could be doing in your business right now. So maybe you could make products, you could make art, you could run group programmes, you could offer one on one sessions. You could create content that people can buy. There’s so many options, but You just kind of throw them all in the page, not overthinking that at all, just a beautiful brainstorm and, and then you look at these two lists, and you ask yourself, which of your ideas, what meet your basic needs, and the easiest way. And those ideas that come up as the to say, top, you know, as the top two or three might not be the most exciting ideas, and that’s alright, but if they meet your needs, right now, that’s a really beautiful thing, and a really great place to start, especially if you’re struggling with overwhelm about your next steps. And if you want to hear more about that, check that episode out. But yeah, the next thing I want to name around is, is that many people make it work in ways that they don’t always talk about. And, and I wish we all talked about that more. And I wish it wasn’t shameful. So you know, if you are feeling shame about being in this place, right now, a feeling like giving up would be a good thing. Remember that there’s people who have husbands that are supportive, or partners, or people who have inherited money, or people who have had more training in are more opportunities to try something or learn something that you had. And that really, that you are in this place right now isn’t a reflection on whether your ideas good enough, or whether you are good enough as a person. And I think we can hold all of this would show so much compassion, we just are all coming from different
places. And that doesn’t necessarily make us better or worse people or business owners, they’re just differences and how easy this is for us. And that’s important to name. I don’t have a partner who supports me, and I haven’t inherited money. But I am a white person, I have worked in many ecommerce companies before I started my own business, I was lucky to be able to access a lot of education. And I have also been lucky to kind of enter a field that was relatively easy to market. And what I mean by that is that I started my business or rather I did a business training online six years ago. And when I signed up, I didn’t really exactly know what I wanted to do. And then in that programme, I saw that many people were struggling to create a WordPress site. And that was something really key that the programme was suggesting we do. And for all kinds of reasons that I’ll go into. In other episodes, I really do believe that WordPress is a great platform for a small business, but it’s a learning curve. And my quiz didn’t exist then. So it does now makes it easier whole. But there weren’t that many courses around back then so many people were really struggling with this. And I found it super easy. I really enjoyed it. And I had been blogging since I was a teenager, so more more than a decade at that point. And I had also built several WordPress sites. So I immediately jumped at this opportunity of teaching myself how WordPress worked. And I developed tech support as well, which I’ve been offering for many years. And that was working so well for me because it solved a problem for people that they were really consciously aware of. And I mean, I’m not an economist, I don’t want to really delve too deeply into these ideas of scarcity and meeting, you know, solving problems for people and all of that. But the reality was that just I was I was surrounded by people who had a budget to pay me. And they knew that I would make their life easier, and that working with me would probably make them more money than they invested in working with me, because they would have ended up having a great website. So it was really kind of easy to Well, not really easy, easy, you know, but it was easier or easy in comparison for me to find my first few clients and make things work that way. And that was definitely stressful at first and I put many, many late nights. But I think I’m all of this to say as then I acknowledge also that some business ideas are trickier to establish than others. And again, that doesn’t make them less worthy, or less exciting or less important to the world. It’s just an invitation to be really creative with how we are sharing our ideas. And I also am excited that the pandemic. As for so many people really shifted our understanding of what’s important, right. I think there’s been a real kind of surge in energy towards supporting small businesses but also supporting ourselves and community resilience and things like gardening and growing staff. and caring for each other and learning new things. And that’s super exciting. So while I’m acknowledging that some businesses are easier to build than, than others, I’m also really holding all this beautiful potential for what is yet to come for us. And I think that will make stuff a lot easier for many of us, which is really exciting. All right, okay, let me look at my notes. I think other things that I want to name that have helped me through these moments of wondering if I should give up is to be really clear on what I’m getting from my business, this really huge sense of freedom and creativity that I get so much joy from, and that I don’t want to miss. And another thing that has had is to choose a very simple life. And I’m saying that from a place of privilege, of course, and but yeah, it has been really helpful for me to think about minimalism, to think about what I really want to need and need to spend money on and, and to to live a fairly lightweight life in the first few years. So up until two years ago, I was living in a tiny house in Brighton, which was the most affordable way for me to live by myself, which I really wanted to do. And then two years ago, I moved to Scotland and I bought a small apartment in a really beautiful town, a small town on the east coast of Scotland, that is pretty underrated, I
think it’s very easy to get to both and burn Glasgow, it’s very easy to get to the beach. There’s blue, beautiful Woodlands around here, but it’s not particularly happy. And so my home is really cheap. Comparatively, it’s a small fraction of anything I’ve ever paid anywhere, even tiny bedrooms in Berlin, back in the naughties, which is a long time ago and time where a billion was much more affordable. Anyway, I’m just really happy about that choice I made. And I acknowledged that it made it so much easier to move through these periods of difficulty and doubt in my business. And it also makes it easier for me to take risks sometimes and to, you know, bring something into being that maybe doesn’t have so much creative. commercial potential. printmaking, for example, last year’s a beautiful idea, I did actually make a good bit of money from selling this first batch of prints that I made. But there was no guarantee it wasn’t something that I had ever done before. I didn’t know how well it would be received. And I think having a fairly simple life allowed me to take that creative leap. And that’s something that really is is very important for me. And having said all that dough, it is of course easier for someone who doesn’t have a family right now to say, Okay, I’m just going to simplify my life or move to a different town that’s much more affordable. That’s not possible for everyone. And that’s okay. But I still think that we can ask ourselves really valuable questions about what we need to feel sustained and where we’re spending our money and energy. And if maybe some of that can be a little bit more simple. I, I also want to talk a little bit about alternatives to giving up on your business or your idea. I’ve seen a lot of people this past year getting a part time online job. And I think I know that can feel discouraging sometimes, because maybe you want to spend all your time and energy on your business. But one thing that makes me feel hopeful around of this around this time is that I’ve seen more and more job offers that said, part time work is much more flexible. And it’s definitely able to work remotely. And of course, the Disability Justice Movement has pushed for this for so long now and has so often been told that this wouldn’t work and people just couldn’t work from home. It wasn’t possible. And now we’ve seen clearly it is possible. And I really hope that many people who are building businesses are becoming artists or building practices in some ways, we’ll have more opportunities to maybe support themselves financially, by this change in work culture, I think it can be really beautiful to do work as a VA to do some editing translation work, to maybe develop one tech school that you can offer to people. And you know, like I said, that is really how it has worked for me. And another piece I think that’s really important as we’re seeking alternatives is to think about boundaries, especially if you’re running programmes or offering things that have a big impact on our time and energy. So what is the challenge for some people’s in times is to come up with an exciting group programme and then mapping out how you know how much time and energy She will take to teach it and then finding that they need a certain number to justify spending that time and energy and then kind of being in that hesitation of knowing that they would need to get this offer in front of quite a big bunch of people to have enough signups. I don’t want to be encouraging him in any way, I think I’m really just sharing that to say, if that’s you right now, you’re definitely not alone. And many people are in this situation, and it has nothing to do with your offer. Of course, there might be ways that it could be improved, you know, but basically, I’m saying, it doesn’t mean that your idea is less worthy of attention, and people investing in it. And I think it’s really important when we’re in situations of considering giving up that we ask ourselves what we really need and what is like our upper and lower boundary here. So maybe that is something like having four people at least in a programme and allow yourself to let it go, at least for now, if you don’t get to have those four people that support you financially. I think it’s just helpful to do think about this. And in terms of numbers, there’s so much to say around you know, our audiences and our newsletter and conversion rates and all that. And I recently recorded an episode called changing the way that we relate to numbers that might be helpful, if this is something that’s on your mind right now. So what are your boundaries, like what would make you feel that you
are ready to release an idea or whole business? For me, it will be something like knowing that I’m not able to meet my basic needs over the long term, or feeling that my mental health was really negatively impacted. Or simply feeling that I don’t want to do this anymore. I’m really giving myself permission to, to just let that be enough as well. And not to make that into a big story around how I’m a quitter, or how I’ve never, you know really stuck something out. Because I’m a snowflake, a millennial snowflake. I think that is Okay, that’s enough just to say that you don’t feel like doing something anymore. And I think also like this permission slip that we can give ourselves of just feeling like, Okay, I’m a bit frustrated with my work right now, it maybe isn’t working the way I had hoped. And I don’t feel this like sense of excitement and creative expression right now. I think sometimes just saying out loud. If I don’t want to do this anymore, it’s okay to let go. We’ll get you through that phase. And maybe allow you to return to a place of feeling really enchanted with your work and really motivated to going on and trying something else. I want to end by touching on the idea of cycles in grief, which has become really important in my business, I think sometimes something that makes us want to give up as well as, just as notice that we’re not always expanding that there are periods where we’re trying something that doesn’t work, and we’re cutting something back. Or we’re releasing something and just to make even more space to accept that that is a really natural part of building a business, being in a creative process being in a relationship with someone being a human at this time and nature. So you know, it’s really not just us who are experiences experiencing these cycles of grief and contraction that is so important to remember, I think. Yeah, I really hope that we can find ways of giving ourselves more headspace and more resources and more having more compassion and remembering that giving up on an idea doesn’t mean that we have to give up on a whole business. I came across a really cool example of this recently on Pinterest, actually where I was researching ideas on simplicity and minimalism. And I came across this person who ran a really popular blog on minimalism and simplicity. And she shared that she initially wanted this business to be her whole thing and then kind of hit a difficult spot and was kind of not feeling so excited about it anymore. So she got a different job that she’s able to do from home, but she continued this blog, and really, you could feel that she’s still putting so much love and energy into it. It’s just not her main focus right now. And I think that can be a really beautiful way of letting an idea breeze until it it’s time is coming to be at at four central stage again. So she’s still offering this little workbook so you can buy them as digital downloads, and she’s still blogging and sharing her pins on Pinterest and it’s actually really big. It has it has a huge audience. But it’s very boundaried I guess and how she works with it on her day to day life. So she writes a new blog post whenever she feels like it. She has an automated process. As around sharing them on Pinterest, and then she has these pre made workbooks that people can download. So it’s really giving her a lot of freedom, a to only work on her business when she feels like it and has an exciting idea, and be also to make money in another way. And I’m just sharing that because I think I want to unshare and shame this, this idea that getting a job is a terrible idea, right? I think sometimes that was early. Sometimes giving yourself permission to let something rest a little bit before you try something new can be really beautiful as well. And I really wish there were more opportunities to to make money in a really easy, steady way that doesn’t take up so much headspace and energy for all of us. All right, I have covered a lot of different things here. And I hope it wasn’t too waffly than that. It just was something that you could listen to as you were going about your day and thinking about the future of your business and the commitments that you’re making and the things that you’re loving about it and the things that are difficult and just to feel a bit less alone in that process. Thank you so much for listening.

#58 Feminism, business joy & leaving social media with Amelia Hruby

#58 Feminism, business joy & leaving social media with Amelia Hruby

Hey friends,

I have two wonderful pieces of news today:

  1. The Embodied Business Community is open for enrolment with one 50% scholarship left and two fair payment plans to choose from, you can learn more & sign up here: https://yarrowdigital.com/diy-business-school/ and here is more info about the web design course: https://yarrowdigital.com/web-design-adventure-course/
  2. I have a new interview episode with the wonderful Amelia Hruby for you! Here is some of what we talked about:
    • Leaving social media and finding joyful ways to share your work
    • What works and what doesn’t in small business marketing
    • Making our businesses more feminist
    • DIY media as a creative future
    • How the pandemic has changed Amelia’s work

I really loved talking to Amelia – there were lots of giggles and a few paws involved as well. This was the kind of conversation that left me feeling energised, hopeful and in love with running a small business. I hope you’ll feel the same!

Amelia Hruby is a feminist writer, educator and podcaster with a PhD in philosophy. She runs a small podcast studio supporting women business owners and creatives in sharing their voices, and works as the Programs Coordinator of Sister, home of Feminist Business School. She is also the host and producer of the podcast Fifty Feminist States, and the author of Fifty Feminist Mantras, an illustrated journal for cultivating feminist consciousness.

http://www.ameliahruby.com/

Amelia’s 100 ways to share your work + life that aren’t social media blog post: http://www.ameliahruby.com/blog/100-ways-to-share

Listen to the DIY Small Business Podcast

on Apple Podcast // Stitcher // Spotify // Soundcloud

 

⋒ Hi, my name is Yarrow and I am your host.

My Embodied Business podcast explores what it means to build a small business with integrity, joy and anti capitalist values. I interview other small business owners and offer solo episodes in which I am answering questions around tech, strategy, more ethical marketing and creative livelihoods.

You can learn more about my web design, tech support, mentoring and community offerings at YarrowDigital.com

Sign up for my newsletter below if you'd like to hear from me about once a month! ⋒

#57 The Embodied Business Community is open + a Web Design Adventure is happening!

#57 The Embodied Business Community is open + a Web Design Adventure is happening!

Hey everyone,

this is just a short & sweet episode to give you more information about the Embodied Business Community, which is now open for enrolment. I’ve been able to completely update and caption our course and there are a few more new features I have shared about in this episode. You can learn more and join us here: https://yarrowdigital.com/diy-business-school/

I’m also offering a live round of the Web Design Adventure course in May, this will be great for anyone who wants to build or update a WordPress site with the support and encouragement of a community. You can learn more and join us here: https://yarrowdigital.com/web-design-adventure-course/

The EBC is $360 for the year and the Web Design Course is $150, both come with payment plans.

Let me know if you have any questions!

Listen to the DIY Small Business Podcast

on Apple Podcast // Stitcher // Spotify // Soundcloud

 

⋒ Hi, my name is Yarrow and I am your host.

My Embodied Business podcast explores what it means to build a small business with integrity, joy and anti capitalist values. I interview other small business owners and offer solo episodes in which I am answering questions around tech, strategy, more ethical marketing and creative livelihoods.

You can learn more about my web design, tech support, mentoring and community offerings at YarrowDigital.com

Sign up for my newsletter below if you'd like to hear from me about once a month! ⋒

Transcript

Hey, everyone, my name is Yarrow and you’re listening to the embodied business podcast. This is just a quick broadcast, if you will to say that the embody business community is open, and I’m running the website adventure alive in May. So in case you don’t know, or you’re unsure, or you’re considering it, but you know, you just need a bit more information. This episode is for you. And I’ll begin with just a few updates from me, there’s not much to say, honestly, I really enjoy the increased light and sunshine and the spring energy. But I’m still home and I’m recovering quite okay from my broken leg. But I’m just making these like, tiny penguin shuffles. So that’s my world at the moment. But it also means that I had a lot of time in March at home to record the whole course for the embody business community, it’s now six rather than 10 modules. And I actually really think that less is more, because it’s easier to navigate. It’s all captioned. And I think it will really support you in integrating everything that we’re learning together. But let me take one step back and tell you what the mid business community actually is. So this is a year long community programme. It includes the six module course that I just talked about, and that really teaches you basically everything I know everything that I learned in the last six years. And it begins with your intentions and why you have started a business or what you really want to do. And goes into depth also, as to who you want to serve, and how you’re going to share your message and build your newsletter list and whether or not you actually want to be on social media, and how and how can you create your own media be that on a blog post or in a podcast, and there’s a lot of behind the scenes videos, where I’m sharing my screen with you. So yeah, there’s a bunch of technical stuff. But you also have journaling prompts that maybe touch more on the emotional elements of what it means to be an entrepreneur and what you really want from this experience. So I love the quiz. I really hope it’s helpful, I got amazing feedback from the people that have already taken that. So yeah, feeling a bit proud to relist, and I’m glad that I was able to re record and just update a little bit on what I think has changed this past year. It also has slides now and it’s captioned. So again, that makes it easier to take in, I think and hope. As part of the community, you also have access to a whole year of life, things with us. And those things are meeting greets, we have co working spaces. We have monthly themed workshops that cover everything from marketing, to launching to branding to SEO, and thereby request. So if there’s anything in the course that you want to go deeper into, I always encourage people to request that as a workshop, and then we’ll all do it together. We also have group support sessions once a month at least. And they’re a great space to just bring anything that you’re struggling with in your business right now or want feedback on. So people sometimes share their launch plans or any product that they want to develop or a stumbling block that they’ve encountered. And then we all kind of share that and try to support each other. It’s a really beautiful space, I always leave these calls feeling just uplifted and more hopeful and more motivated to integrate what we’re learning together. We also have Monday, accountability posts. So each week on a Monday, people are invited to commit to something that they want to work on that week. And we’re just witnessing each other. And I think that creates another really beautiful element of gentle group accountability that I so appreciate. I think that the embody business community is great if you want to feel less alone. And you need both technical and strategic training. But you also want to make sure that you really following through and integrating everything. And you want to be in a space with like minded people that kind of all have similar but different goals. So and what I mean by that is that I think we all share values and the kind of ways that we like to run our businesses as similar. I think most of us we really value sustainability and gentleness and honesty. But also we’re ambitious, of course, as well. We also want to grow and expand and express our creativity. But we all different work in different industries. So there’s a lot of body workers, a lot of creative people, hunt makers, you know, people who have create herbal potions, for example, or who make textile art, we have a music teacher. So it’s not so much about what field you’re in, but I think it’s more about what you value and how you want to show up in your business. So I’ll link to this in the show notes in case you want to know more. It is open at the moment till the 27th of April. We have 15 spots when they sell out. They’re sold out And it cost $360 for the year, which you can pay in instalments if you like. There’s also a bonus this year. So if you want to sign up for both the body business community and the web design quiz that I also re recorded and updated in mind, then you’re getting 30 pounds or $30 off. And there’s more information on that on the website. And again, I’m linking to that in the show notes. But basically, I recorded them web design adventure course. And that really takes you through everything you need to know to build a WordPress site. So we’re again, beginning with your intentions with your ideas, were doing some research together on what you like, and what you see as a vision for your own website. And you’re gathering all of that. And then I’m sharing my screen with you. And I read showing you step by step how you put the different pieces together and how you can make good choices about the software that you’re using. I really love this work. And I’m just excited to empower people to make their own website, if that’s what they choose to do. So this is an evergreen quiz, which means that you can take the quiz at any time, you don’t have to sign up right now, it’s always available. But if you do sign up, now you can do it live with us in May. So in May, there’ll be four Mondays, in which I’m teaching each of the classes or each of the modules of the quiz live. So you get immediate access. And you can get started right now if you want. But then in May, you’ll be able to join this group of people, we’re all working together through this course at the same time. So you get to ask questions, we can look at your ideas. And you can just go a little bit deeper. And again, make sure that you’re actually doing this thing because I know, it’s hard to stay motivated if you’re doing it completely on your own. So I wanted to offer this extra support in a way that’s affordable. At the moment, also, I am offering the branding course for free. So I have another smaller course called branding with Canva. And if you sign up for the embodied business community and the WordPress web design course, in April, you’re getting the branding course for free. And that’s a really nice primer that I think helps you to create a visual language for your business that really reflects your values and what you’re here to do. So check that out the link again, in the show notes. This is the last time I’m going to offer the embodied business community at this price. So it’s not the last time you can join it will open again probably in October, but I’m switching to opening it twice a year rather than three times a year. And they will increase the price next time. So I wanted to be upfront about that. I’m also offering 250 percent scholarships, and again more information and the application form for that or in the website. So let me know if you have any questions and thank you so much for listening.

Your business can be a blessing to the world. 

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